Microsoft want you to pay more and get less with the new Office 2013 surprise

Posted on: February 21st, 2013 by Ashley No Comments


Microsoft have today pointed out to users and resellers that the new version of office 2013, will only be able to be used on one Computer and not transferred to another machine even if you uninstall it from the first.

Over the past few weeks there has been an outrage with the news that Microsoft have changed the terms of its new office suite. Cast as the new flagship office that integrates with office 365 it will now prevent users from upgrading their machine and using their still using the original office installation.

The paragraph that has caused the most outrage is the following from the terms and conditions:

“You may not transfer the software to another computer or user. You may transfer the software directly to a third party only as installed on the licensed computer, with the Certificate of Authenticity label and this agreement. Before the transfer, that party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software. You may not retain any copies.”

So in basic terms this means that if you wish to give your version of office away, you will have to give them your whole PC with the software installed.  Microsoft expect you to purchase a brand new version for every PC.  On top of this, Office 2013 is on average more expensive than Office 2010 was only a couple of months ago.

Is this Microsoft trying to defeat the license cheats or run a new get rich scheme – who knows?

All that is known is that the Redmond giant has put these terms in place and do not seem to be moving from them.

A Microsoft staffer did state that the “Office 2010 was chosen by a majority of customers worldwide” So who thinks that they read the fine print that stated these same rules with the PKC versions of office 2010 not being transferable.

Office terms and conditions make it very clear with the following:

We do not sell our software or your copy of it – we only license it. Under our license we grant you the right to install and run that one copy on one computer (the licensed computer) for use by one person at a time, but only if you comply with all the terms of this agreement. Our software license is permanently assigned to the licensed computer.

Is this not the same trick that rival computer firm Apple pulled when a popular film star wanted to leave his large iTunes collection to his family when he dies via his will.

At what point will customers start to fight back with open source versions of Office like Libre Office and Open Office.